Why not protect those you love?

If you knew that you could help protect you, your family and friends from life threatening health problems, would you?

We acted to protect ourselves and our neighbors here in Ogunquit, voting to use only organic pesticides and fertilizers about three years ago. Since then several other Maine communities have followed suit. The question is why more towns have not also voted to use only organic products on lawns and gardens.

Companies that had produced chemical weapons during the Second World War were looking for another market for their products following the end of that war in 1945, and so we saw the beginnings of the synthetic pesticides and fertilizers marketed for the large corporate farms, as well as for the lawns and gardens of a growing suburbia.

Heavy advertising convinced many of these new suburbanites, with lawns and gardens for the first time, that if they wished to have green, weed free lawns and fast growing flowers and vegetables, the synthetic chemical fertilizers and pesticides were best.

But Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring published over 50 years ago made many people seriously examine the harmful effects of chemical pesticides, although it took 10 years for the government to act on her revelations.

 

Now most people know of the convincing links between numerous life threatening health problems and the use of these chemical pesticides.

Chemical companies, many of them international and foreign owned, persist in influencing politicians’ votes; golf courses and farms and garden centers are fearful of letting synthetic, chemical pesticides and fertilizers go in favor of organic replacements.

It’s time we are told the truth about the pesticides in our commercial fruits and vegetables, as well as in the grains used to make our commercial breads, cereals, crackers and cookies and other products.

If you feel the EPA and other government agencies are not doing their job to protect all of us, then isn’t it time that you and your neighbors got together to pass your own pesticide ordinance in your town?

Bill Baker

About Bill Baker

Bill's interest in a clean place to live is rooted in growing up in the country – a cornfield across the road and fields, sandstone cliffs and hundreds of acres of woods where he spent many hours.