Nosy about what your neighbors are spraying on their properties? Try this…

 

bdn-formsLet’s just spend a couple of minutes looking at that pesticide notification form that will notify you about any commercial organic or chemical pesticides being applied to your neighbors’ properties.

Where can you find it? It’s on line at Maine Pesticide Notification Registry. Print it out and you will see spaces for your neighbors’ names. You only can fill in those neighbors within 250 feet of your property line.

How can you find out if they are within 250’ of your property? The easiest way for us is to measure our pace or stride. Say your stride measures about 2’. Then all you have to do is to pace about 125 paces and write down your neighbors’ names and addresses. It’s a good idea to tell your neighbors what you’re doing if they’re around.

Most of our neighbors are seasonal and so aren’t home sometimes when their lawn and garden services come to spray or scatter stuff on their lawns and gardens so they may have little idea what is being placed on their property.

If you live in a town where chemical pesticides are allowed, then you will be notified what will be sprayed or placed on lawns and gardens. Often you have to ask the lawn and garden service the name of the product they plan to use. Once you have the name, then you can find out about it.

Is this a product safe for children and pets? Is it a product that should not be used within a certain distances of streams, ponds or the ocean?
If you feel your neighbors are open to what is being used on their properties, perhaps you could talk to them about these products.

Even if you live in an all organic town as we do, you can find out a lot about the products being used and might want to use them for your own property. Or if the products are organic, but not people or pet friendly, you might want to know that as well.

In any case, this is information you can use for your and your neighbors’ benefit.

Bill Baker

About Bill Baker

Bill's interest in a clean place to live is rooted in growing up in the country – a cornfield across the road and fields, sandstone cliffs and hundreds of acres of woods where he spent many hours.